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Workweek Workout

Karen and Mark Plucinski train for 50- or 100-mile ultramarathons while having full-time careers. Karen, a professor at Missouri Southern State University, and Mark, a safety consultant with Summit Safety Group, share their tips for fitting training into

By: Rose Marthis

Apr 27 2016 at 3 a.m.

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Monday
Do cross-training with a non-impact exercise that still gets your heart rate up. Mark suggests 60 minutes on an elliptical or stationary bike. 

 

Tuesday
Start running as many miles as you can, accomplishing 7 to 8 miles near the end of your training period. 

 

Wednesday
Start running as many miles as you can, accomplishing 7 to 8 miles near the end of your training period. 

 

Thursday
Start running as many miles as you can, accomplishing 10 to 12 miles near the end of your training period.

 

Friday
Let your muscles recover with cross-training exercises before a high-volume weekend. Try swimming. 

 

Saturday
Run 10 to 15 miles. On weekends, you will build up two consecutive double-digit runs back-to-back. 

 

Sunday
The Sunday run is contingent upon what distance you are training for, Mark says. If you’re running a 50-mile race, he suggests 35 miles as a target long run. For a 100-mile race, run 45 miles. Power hike when necessary. Just be sure to stay on your feet for 4 to 5 hours.

 

 

Extra Tips from Mark

 

Hydrate, Hydrate, Hydrate

“Training for an ultra is also about learning what works from the hydration and nutrition perspective as well. You will be out there for a long time, and staying on top of calories and fluids are as important as your fitness,” Mark says.

 

Prioritizing is Key

“Ultra training is a commitment that will include you and anyone else significant in your life. Time commitments (especially on weekends), energy level drops, and nutrition requirements can be overcome by simple communication and compromise.” 

 

Food is Fuel

“Nutrition and hydration are important. Very often, an increase in exercise levels when combined with dieting can result in decreased performance. Water-weight loss as a result of a lack of rehydration is unhealthy as well.”